Sponges of the Burgess Shale (Middle Cambrian), British Columbia
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Sponges of the Burgess Shale (Middle Cambrian), British Columbia by J. Keith Rigby

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Published by Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, Geological Association of Canada in Calgary, Alta, Toronto, Ont .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Sponges, Fossil.,
  • Paleontology -- Cambrian.,
  • Paleontology -- British Columbia -- Burgess Shale,
  • Burgess Shale (B.C.)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 60-65.

StatementJ. Keith Rigby.
SeriesPalaeontographica Canadiana -- no. 2
ContributionsCanadian Society of Petroleum Geologists., Geological Association of Canada.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQE775 R55 1986
The Physical Object
Pagination105 p. :
Number of Pages105
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16427497M

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Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. Sponges of the Burgess shale (Middle Cambrian), British Columbia in SearchWorks catalog. Sponges of the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale and Stephen Formations, British Columbia J. Keith Rigby and Desmond Collins. Created Date: 12/27/ AM. "[An] extraordinary book Mr. Gould is an exceptional combination of scientist and science writer He is thus exceptionally well placed to tell these stories, and he tells them with fervor and intelligence."―James Gleick, New York Times Book Review High in the Canadian Rockies is a small limestone quarry formed million years ago called the Burgess by: Wonderful Life: The Burgess Shale and the Nature of History is a book on the evolution of Cambrian fauna by Harvard paleontologist Stephen Jay volume made The New York Times Best Seller list, was the winner of the Royal Society's Rhone-Poulenc Prize, the American Historical Association's Forkosch Award, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

Buy Sponges of the Burgess shale (Middle Cambrian), British Columbia (Palaeontographica canadiana) by Rigby, J. Keith (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : J. Keith Rigby. His book, The Crucible of Creation: The Burgess Shale and the Rise of Animals, includes an engrossing time-travel section that brings the period to vivid life. He also argues that convergence plays a larger role in evolution than contingency does, and that some of the Burgess creatures that seem to be without descendents are in fact ancestors. The fossils of the Burgess Shale, like the Burgess Shale itself, formed around million years ago in the Mid Cambrian were discovered in Canada in , and Charles Doolittle Walcott collected o specimens in a series of field trips up from to After a period of neglect from the s to the early s, new excavations and re-examinations of Walcott's.   A book about wonder and a wonderful book. The story of the Burgess Shale—from its initial misinterpretation to its reassessment 50 years later—is mind blowing. This limestone outcropping, which sits at an altitude of 8, feet in the Canadian Rockies, near British Columbia, was at equatorial sea level million years ago. /5().

Burgess Shale genera, Anomalocaris, Laggania and Hurdia, were described in full. Here we present new frontal appendage material of additional anomalocaridid taxa from the ‘Middle’ Cambrian (Series 3) Burgess Shale Formation in Canada, showing that the diversity of anomalocaridids in this locality is even higher than previously thought. Slides of soft mud had covered a single area rather quickly, then hardened to form what is known as the Burgess Shale. Trapped in this formation were hundreds of well-preserved invertebrates that had lived from million to over million years ago. This book contains essays by well known specialists in the archaeological geology s: 2. The monotypic Burgess Shale sponge genus Takakkawia Walcott, , has been previously assigned to the Protomonaxonida, despite showing several unique features. A reassessment of the genus, including restudy of previously described material and the addition of new material that includes partially disarticulated specimens, has allowed a greatly modified understanding of its structure.   "[An] extraordinary book Mr. Gould is an exceptional combination of scientist and science writer He is thus exceptionally well placed to tell these stories, and he tells them with fervor and intelligence."—James Gleick, New York Times Book Review High in the Canadian Rockies is a small limestone quarry formed million years ago called the Burgess s: